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Global Health Student Photography Contest

2010 Global Health Student Photography Awardees

In October 2010, the Emory Global Health Institute announced the winning and honorable mention photographs from its 2010 Global Health Student Photography Contest. The purpose of the contest is to foster cultural sensitivity by encouraging Emory students conducting global health projects to examine the culture and people with whom they are working.

In 2010, the Institute received more than 200 submissions, which you can view here. Mr. Bob Yellowlees, an Atlanta business leader, philanthropist, and photographer who founded Lumière Gallery, sponsors the student photography contest.

Learn more about the upcoming Global Health Student Photography Contest.

Students submitting Winning Photographs included:

Stephanie Edlhuber, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Lauren Ansley Howe, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Becky Tsang, Rollins School of Public Health
Nicole Williams, Rollins School of Public Health

Students submitting Honorable Mention Photographs included:

Linn Bergander, Rollins School of Public Health
Lucy Crawford, Rollins School of Public Health
Dennis Flores, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Catherine Finneran, Rollins School of Public Health
Shivani Jain, Emory College
Megan Graham, Rollins School of Public Health

The 2010 winning photographs can be viewed below.

2010 contest edlhuber

Untitled - Stephanie Edlhuber, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
The Dominican Republic has a system of community clinics that addresses the needs of some of the poorest citizens. There is a complex public option for insurance, and many needy patients only qualify to receive basic care, not intensive treatments. This a picture of a young Dominican doctor performing a physical assessment of a 13-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. His mother and grandmother have cared for him since birth without the aid of NG tubes, wheelchairs, suctioning, etc. He has lived in the same bed, protected by a mosquito net, and fed a diet of milk for his entire life. The doctor later expressed her frustration in not being able to provide more for this patient, such as a wheelchair or physical therapy. This is an unfortunate reality for many special needs children.

2010 contest howe

Schoolchild Receiving Measles Vaccine - Laurel Ansley Howe, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing and Rollins School of Public Health
A community health worker administers a measles vaccination to a child in northern Malawi. Following an outbreak of measles in March of 2010, Doctors Without Borders joined with the Ministry of Health in Malawi for a massive vaccination campaign. Community health workers were trained to participate in a campaign; supplies were ordered and shipped from India, Belgium, and France. In eight weeks, more than three million children were vaccinated against the measles.

2010 contest tsang

Floating Islands of Uros, Lago Titicaca, Peru - Becky Tsang, Rollins School of Public Health
These man-made reed islands were built by locals to escape the advancing Incan Empire. This eight-year-old girl was the "captain" of our boat, a raft made entirely of reeds for their livelihood - construction, fuel, tourism, and even food, as young reeds are edible. Their lifestyle is highly dependent on tourism and on the maintenance of their ecosystem, but the two also conflict - the boats that bring tourists provide valuable income that would otherwise force them to abandon their traditional way of life, but they also pollute the water that provides marine life. Their isolation (only two hours from Puno by boat, but the travel costs money and many amenities must be brought from the mainland) is a reminder that for the people of Uros, clean water, education, and fresh food are not easily accessible luxuries.

2010 contest williams

Recovery - Nicole Williams, Rollins School of Public Health
This photograph depicts empty beds in the recovery room for general surgery in Rwanda. A dirty foam pad on a rusty metal frame awaits patients after surgery here. Patients must bring bedding and depend on family members to bring and prepare meals. Clean bedding or privacy are hardly options as many patients have only one thin piece of fabric to bring and as many as 15 beds can line the walls of one room. Mothers will share cots with their children as nurses struggle to keep track of patients. There is an overwhelming smell as infections fester and the beating African sun shines on sweating, bandaged bodies.

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